(In)Decision Making


Are you more likely to book your next vacation through LastMinute.com or through PlanWayAhead.com?  Do you make snap decisions or like to keep your options open?  Are you usually the first to meetings or the last? Do you like to arrive at the airport with seconds to spare or would this send your stress sky high?  Is your desk clean or chaotic?  Are deadlines your friend or foe? Do you like to focus on a task to completion or have many balls in the air?  Do you always finish what you start?  Are you a procrastinator?

Procrasintation

Read the Procrastinator's Creed

These behaviors are tied together on psychological scales.  Awareness of your natural behavior has its benefits, not least that it gives you greater opportunity to consciously adjust your behavior according to circumstance.

Recognizing and understanding the decision-making style of colleagues has its benefits too. It can reduce tension and misunderstandings between people with different styles.  It can help like-minded individuals to avoid group-think. It allows diverse teams to play to the strengths of individuals.
Read on…


Abstract Oriented Programmer


Here’s a story I have heard many times about programmers.

“I asked Joe to write a simple bit of code to do <xyz>.  It should have taken a few hours, maybe a day at worst.  He took several days, he wrote a general framework that was far more complicated than we needed.  Why does he keep over-engineering his code?”

It could be that Joe is an Abstract Oriented Programmer.  Here’s a few snowclones

If you often over-engineer your software, you might just be an Abstract Oriented Programmer.

If you spend more time thinking about tomorrow’s problems than today’s, you might just be an Abstract Oriented Programmer.

If you love looking for deeper patterns, get thrills from unconscious insight or talk in analogies, you might just be an Abstract Oriented Programmer.

Read on…


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